Share

George Church

Ph.D.

Director, NHGRI Center for Excellence in Genomic Science

Robert Winthrop Professor of Genetics, Harvard Medical School

Professor of Health Sciences and Technology, Harvard and MIT

Founding Core Faculty and Lead, Wyss Institute, Harvard University

Dr. Church  is Professor of Genetics at Harvard Medical School and Professor of Health Sciences and Technology at Harvard and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), a founding member of the Wyss Institute, and Director of PersonalGenomes.org, the world’s only open-access information on human genomic, environmental, and trait data. Dr. Church is Director of IARPA & NIH BRAIN Projects, and Director of the National Institutes of Health Center for Excellence in Genomic Science. 

Dr. Church is known for pioneering the fields of personal genomics and synthetic biology. He developed the first methods for the first genome sequence & dramatic cost reductions since then (down from $3 billion to $600), contributing to nearly all “next generation sequencing” methods and companies. His team invented CRISPR for human stem cell genome editing and other synthetic biology technologies and applications – including new ways to create organs for transplantation, gene therapies for aging reversal, and gene drives to eliminate Lyme Disease and Malaria. He has co-authored more than 590 papers and 155 patent publications, and one book, “Regenesis”.

He has received numerous awards including the 2011 Bower Award and Prize for Achievement in Science from the Franklin Institute, the Time 100, and election to the National Academy of Sciences and Engineering.

George Church

Ph.D.

Director, NHGRI Center for Excellence in Genomic Science

Robert Winthrop Professor of Genetics, Harvard Medical School

Professor of Health Sciences and Technology, Harvard and MIT

Founding Core Faculty and Lead, Wyss Institute, Harvard University

Dr. Church  is Professor of Genetics at Harvard Medical School and Professor of Health Sciences and Technology at Harvard and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), a founding member of the Wyss Institute, and Director of PersonalGenomes.org, the world’s only open-access information on human genomic, environmental, and trait data. Dr. Church is Director of IARPA & NIH BRAIN Projects, and Director of the National Institutes of Health Center for Excellence in Genomic Science. 

Dr. Church is known for pioneering the fields of personal genomics and synthetic biology. He developed the first methods for the first genome sequence & dramatic cost reductions since then (down from $3 billion to $600), contributing to nearly all “next generation sequencing” methods and companies. His team invented CRISPR for human stem cell genome editing and other synthetic biology technologies and applications – including new ways to create organs for transplantation, gene therapies for aging reversal, and gene drives to eliminate Lyme Disease and Malaria. He has co-authored more than 590 papers and 155 patent publications, and one book, “Regenesis”.

He has received numerous awards including the 2011 Bower Award and Prize for Achievement in Science from the Franklin Institute, the Time 100, and election to the National Academy of Sciences and Engineering.

Recent Publications

Template-independent enzymatic synthesis of RNA oligonucleotides

Published On 2024 Jul 12

Journal article

RNA oligonucleotides have emerged as a powerful therapeutic modality to treat disease, yet current manufacturing methods may not be able to deliver on anticipated future demand. Here, we report the development and optimization of an aqueous-based, template-independent enzymatic RNA oligonucleotide synthesis platform as an alternative to traditional chemical methods. The enzymatic synthesis of RNA oligonucleotides is made possible by controlled incorporation of reversible terminator nucleotides...


Multiplexed in situ protein imaging using DNA-barcoded antibodies with extended hybridization chain reactions

Published On 2024 Jul 05

Journal article

Antibodies have long served as vital tools in biological and clinical laboratories for the specific detection of proteins. Conventional methods employ fluorophore or horseradish peroxidase-conjugated antibodies to detect signals. More recently, DNA-conjugated antibodies have emerged as a promising technology, capitalizing on the programmability and amplification capabilities of DNA to enable highly multiplexed and ultrasensitive protein detection. However, the nonspecific binding of...