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Robert S.D. Higgins

M.D., MSHA

President of Brigham and Women’s Hospital

Executive Vice President, Mass General Brigham

Elizabeth G. and Gary J. Nabel Family Professor of Surgery, Harvard Medical School

Dr. Higgins is the President of Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Executive Vice President at Mass General Brigham. He previously served as Surgeon-in-Chief at Johns Hopkins Hospital, the William Stewart Halsted Professor of Surgery and Director of the Department of Surgery at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Dr. Higgins is a leading authority in heart and lung transplantation, minimally invasive cardiac surgery and mechanical circulatory support. He is renowned as a world class researcher and is recognized nationally and internationally for his research in the areas of heart and lung transplantation and disparities in outcomes in cardiac surgery.

Prior to joining Hopkins, He served as Department of Surgery Chair and Director of the Comprehensive Transplant Center at The Ohio State University Medical Center. He also served as a Major in the United States Army Reserve Medical Corps for 13 years and while doing so, supported the Richmond Veterans Administration transplantation program.

Dr. Higgins has served in numerous national professional leadership roles including the President of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons, President of the United Network for Organ Sharing, President of the Society of Black Academic Surgeons, President and founding member of the Association of Black Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgeons and as a member of the Board of Directors of the American Board of Thoracic Surgery.

Dr. Higgins earned his bachelor’s degree from Dartmouth College and medical degree from Yale School of Medicine. He completed a residency in general surgery and served as Chief Resident at the University Hospitals of Pittsburgh. He was a Winchester Scholar and fellow in cardiothoracic surgery at the Yale School of Medicine and earned a master’s degree in health services administration at Virginia Commonwealth University.

Robert S.d. Higgins

M.D., MSHA

President of Brigham and Women’s Hospital

Executive Vice President, Mass General Brigham

Elizabeth G. and Gary J. Nabel Family Professor of Surgery, Harvard Medical School

Dr. Higgins is the President of Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Executive Vice President at Mass General Brigham. He previously served as Surgeon-in-Chief at Johns Hopkins Hospital, the William Stewart Halsted Professor of Surgery and Director of the Department of Surgery at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Dr. Higgins is a leading authority in heart and lung transplantation, minimally invasive cardiac surgery and mechanical circulatory support. He is renowned as a world class researcher and is recognized nationally and internationally for his research in the areas of heart and lung transplantation and disparities in outcomes in cardiac surgery.

Prior to joining Hopkins, He served as Department of Surgery Chair and Director of the Comprehensive Transplant Center at The Ohio State University Medical Center. He also served as a Major in the United States Army Reserve Medical Corps for 13 years and while doing so, supported the Richmond Veterans Administration transplantation program.

Dr. Higgins has served in numerous national professional leadership roles including the President of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons, President of the United Network for Organ Sharing, President of the Society of Black Academic Surgeons, President and founding member of the Association of Black Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgeons and as a member of the Board of Directors of the American Board of Thoracic Surgery.

Dr. Higgins earned his bachelor’s degree from Dartmouth College and medical degree from Yale School of Medicine. He completed a residency in general surgery and served as Chief Resident at the University Hospitals of Pittsburgh. He was a Winchester Scholar and fellow in cardiothoracic surgery at the Yale School of Medicine and earned a master’s degree in health services administration at Virginia Commonwealth University.