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Amani Al-Hajeri

M.D., CABFM, IBFM, M.Sc. MG

Director, National Genome Center

Ministry of Health, Kingdom of Bahrain

Consultant Clinical Geneticist

Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor, Al Jawhara Centre, Arabian Gulf University

Head of The Genetic Department, Salmaniya Medical Complex

Dr. Amani Al Hajeri is the Head of the Genetic Department at Salmanyia Medical Complex-Ministry of Health in Bahrain and the former Manager of the National Genome Project. She is a Clinical Assistant Professor at Al Jawhara Center, a consultant clinical geneticist and a consultant family physician. She had her BSc in Basic medical sciences with honors from the Arabian Gulf University and graduated as a medical doctor from the same university. She joined the Family residency program for 4 years and attained the Arab Board Certificate in Family and Community Medicine and the Irish Board in Family medicine. She later joined the genetics department at the Ministry of Health and completed a master degree in Medical Genetics (with honors) from the University of Glasgow/ UK.

Dr. Al Hajeri has more than 46 publications in local and international peer reviewed journals. She is also a senior editor at Bahrain Medical Bulletin and an expert reviewer in several international medical journals. She has a special interest in evidence-based medicine, rare diseases, and common complex genetic disorders. She is a member in several governmental committees and a member in many professional societies and NGOs.

Amani Al-Hajeri

M.D., CABFM, IBFM, M.Sc. MG

Director, National Genome Center

Ministry of Health, Kingdom of Bahrain

Consultant Clinical Geneticist

Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor, Al Jawhara Centre, Arabian Gulf University

Head of The Genetic Department, Salmaniya Medical Complex

Dr. Amani Al Hajeri is the Head of the Genetic Department at Salmanyia Medical Complex-Ministry of Health in Bahrain and the former Manager of the National Genome Project. She is a Clinical Assistant Professor at Al Jawhara Center, a consultant clinical geneticist and a consultant family physician. She had her BSc in Basic medical sciences with honors from the Arabian Gulf University and graduated as a medical doctor from the same university. She joined the Family residency program for 4 years and attained the Arab Board Certificate in Family and Community Medicine and the Irish Board in Family medicine. She later joined the genetics department at the Ministry of Health and completed a master degree in Medical Genetics (with honors) from the University of Glasgow/ UK.

Dr. Al Hajeri has more than 46 publications in local and international peer reviewed journals. She is also a senior editor at Bahrain Medical Bulletin and an expert reviewer in several international medical journals. She has a special interest in evidence-based medicine, rare diseases, and common complex genetic disorders. She is a member in several governmental committees and a member in many professional societies and NGOs.

Recent Publications

Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for people with ß-thalassaemia major

Published On 2016 Dec 01

Journal article

BACKGROUND: Thalassemia is an inherited autosomal recessive blood disorder, caused by mutations in globin genes or their regulatory regions. This results in a reduced rate of synthesis of one of the globin chains that make up haemoglobin. In ß-thalassaemia major there is an underproduction of ß-globin chains combined with excess of free α-globin chains. The excess free α-globin chains precipitate in red blood cells, leading to their destruction (haemolysis) and ineffective erythropoiesis. The...


Piracetam for reducing the incidence of painful sickle cell disease crises

Published On 2016 Feb 13

Journal article

BACKGROUND: Sickle cell disease is one of the most common genetic disorders. Sickle cell crises in which irregular and dehydrated cells contribute to blocking of blood vessels are characterised by episodes of pain. Treatment is mainly supportive and symptomatic. In vitro studies with piracetam indicate that it has the potential for inhibition and a reversal of the process of sickling of erythrocytes. This is an update of a previously published Cochrane review.